Brassed Off Britannia

Brassed Off Britannia

For a moan about the state of Britain and the World

 

 

 

Home   |   About BOB   |   Poetry   |   Contact Us   |   Forum Home

 
It is currently Sat Sep 21, 2019 9:24 pm

All times are UTC + 1 hour




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: What a day.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 10:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 11:41 am
Posts: 6348
Not sure if this is sport or literature but four of us went to the Ledbury Festival to see Tony Benn. He was speaking at Hellens, a breathtaking manor house in Much Marcle. I suspect, like many others, I didn't agree with his politics but admired the man. He is now very old (same age as the Queen) and bearded. But still, though bent and slow, with a clear and precise voice.

You sensed that around the room (and don't forget this was Herefordshire heartland, Tory to its bootlaces) a palpable wish for him to succeed. He stumbled over a bit of Blake, he lost his way when quoting D.H.Lawrence, But it was his choice of music that amazed me. The Battle Hymn of the Republic, the chorus to which we all had to sing and Starry Starry Night the record by Don MacLean.

As we came out a friend reminded me of a talk on BBC by Harold Macmillan. He was over ninety and lucid as ever. "Beware the old magicians," said my friend.

From there we went to the dying hour of cricket at the College Ground. The Old Pats Tent was full of people that had forgotten me or never knew me, and a few that remembered me and treated me to a great deal of beer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJpQJWpVJds


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 11:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 11:41 am
Posts: 6348
I forgot to tell you of the other favourite record of his. Would you believe Senex, its The Slow Train. And another snippet. Stephanie Flanders, the BBC political editor, is the great man's daughter.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 11:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 02, 2010 9:18 pm
Posts: 3227
Location: Elgar country
Hook Dangler wrote:
I forgot to tell you of the other favourite record of his. Would you believe Senex, its The Slow Train. And another snippet. Stephanie Flanders, the BBC political editor, is the great man's daughter.

1) I think a love of Slow Train might be a decent test for Englishness - among the older age group anyway.

2) Well, I never. Maybe explains why she takes an almost Marxist stance on economics.

I know Viscount Stansgate is now a revered figure - I almost revere him myself, and he can speak brilliantly about practically anything. But there was a time he looked dangerous. Thank goodness he never got his foot in the door of No.10.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 7:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:21 am
Posts: 3402
Location: Surrey
I had a great day yesterday - went to the Battle Proms at Blenheim Palace. Great music - 1812 overture and Beethoven's Battle Symphony, both complete with nearly 200 cannon plus muskets and fireworks, Rule Britannia, Jerusalem, Land of Hope and Glory and more, plus some excellent singing, violin solos and more fireworks. All preceded by a nice picnic and a display, set to music, by a Spitfire. Fantastic atmosphere, similar to that at the Schoenbrunn Sommernachts Konzerts, but a bit more relaxed.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 9:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 11:41 am
Posts: 6348
Sounds brilliant Greg. How do I get tickets for that?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 10:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:21 am
Posts: 3402
Location: Surrey
The link to their site is here:

http://www.battleproms.com/open-air-con ... -prom.html

Ragley Hall would seem to be your nearest. Well owrth the effort if there is a group of you prepared to enjoy yourselves!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 11:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:35 am
Posts: 5976
Location: Fleurieu, South Australia
greg wrote:
Fantastic atmosphere, similar to that at the Schoenbrunn Sommernachts Konzerts, but a bit more relaxed.

Just don't mention the war.
And, with cannon and muskets, was the atmosphere somewhat sulfurous?

_________________
Love people, use things - not the opposite.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 12:08 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:21 am
Posts: 3402
Location: Surrey
The Austrians don't seem to worry much about the war, and in this case the war was the Peninsular war (the Beethoven work was written to commemorate the battle of Vitoria in 1813 - I hope CC raised a glass on June 21 for the 200 the anniversary) when we were fighting the French and the concert took place in Blenheim Palace - given to the commanding general by 'a grateful nation' after the victory in the Battle of Blenheim in 1704, when we fought on he same side as the Austrians and Germans.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 4:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 02, 2010 6:56 pm
Posts: 9404
Location: Lake District, England
greg wrote:
...the Beethoven work was written to commemorate the battle of Vitoria in 1813 - I hope CC raised a glass on June 21 for the 200 the anniversary...

Actually, I didn't, but I should have done - a remarkable battle that was the turning point of the Peninsular campaign. Despite being outnumbered, the French were so confident of victory that stands were erected in the hillside for the nobs to watch the centre where Wellington would march his army straight into Marshall Jourdan's guns and be destroyed. It must have been quite a surprise when our lot appeared on the French right having crossing the uncrossable river. What is also remarkable, and typical of the time, was that Wellington did march on the guns across open ground suffering most of his 5,000 losses to canon fire, a necessary sacrifice (in his eyes) to fool the enemy. But very much the same attitude remained through the first World War barely a hundred years ago - troops as canon fodder.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 8:43 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:56 pm
Posts: 1475
Location: Switzerland
greg wrote:
I had a great day yesterday - went to the Battle Proms at Blenheim Palace. Great music - 1812 overture and Beethoven's Battle Symphony, both complete with nearly 200 cannon plus muskets and fireworks, Rule Britannia, Jerusalem, Land of Hope and Glory and more, plus some excellent singing, violin solos and more fireworks. All preceded by a nice picnic and a display, set to music, by a Spitfire. Fantastic atmosphere, similar to that at the Schoenbrunn Sommernachts Konzerts, but a bit more relaxed.


That sounds really, really enjoyable Greg. Would loved to have been there!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:21 am
Posts: 3402
Location: Surrey
Not quite true, CC. Wellington had the choice - outflank, or frontal attack and in the event he chose to do both. In the Great War, with the Western Front stretching in an unbroken line from the sea at Nieuport to the Swiss border the ONLY option was frontal attack against heavily fortified positions. At the end of 1914 the Germans held almost all of Belgium and a good part of France so they simply had to sit tight and hold that ground to win the war; the British and French had the choice - accept the status quo and lose the war, or attack. They chose the latter option and a careful study of the battles fought as the war progressed will reveal that tactics changed from battle to battle, particularly in the use of artillery and in infantry tactics.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:55 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 02, 2010 6:56 pm
Posts: 9404
Location: Lake District, England
I thought the purpose of the frontal attack at Vitoria was to engage the enemy's attention (and guns) while the flanking attack was launched. Of course, the usual failures of competence and communication occurred and the flank attack was delayed leaving the British to take a severe battering approaching the guns.

What was interesting was that having taken such heavy losses in the early stages our men were beyond control once the victory was won and the very rich baggage train (Joseph Bonaparte's royal treasures) was available for looting. They got just about all of it and a lot of people became very rich that day. Nosey was absolutely furious.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What a day.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 2:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:21 am
Posts: 3402
Location: Surrey
He probably thought he should have first pickings!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 1 hour


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group